Case Studies

  1. ELEARNING - IS THE REVOLUTION HERE?

    ELEARNING - IS THE REVOLUTION HERE?

    Fifty-five years ago this month UNICOL began providing stands to support 35mm carousel slide projectors in schools across the UK. So began the audiovisual (AV) industry and the introduction of projected images to enhance the learning experience.  Many years later and with the terms eLearning and Edtech driving modern thinking you would imagine the classroom of today would look very different. However, in general the teacher still stands at the front of a room full of students and the blackboard has been replaced with a whiteboard or TV screen. Obviously, the curriculum has changed and the ability to have immediate information from across the globe has enriched learning through collaboration and sharing.  

    Has the revolution happened or about to happen?
    It is estimated that the global eLearning market is worth £120 billion and could double in size over the next decade but will it help or hinder? Who should benefit? The winners should be both students an

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  2. WHEN THE MATRIX MEETS EDUCATION

    WHEN THE MATRIX MEETS EDUCATION

    With approximately 95% of the population benefiting from learning through auditory and visual means, and 65% of that being visual, it’s never been more important for teaching to develop with the rise in technology.1

    Blending technology with traditional teaching allows for teachers to share information both auditory and visually. Through the last 15-20 years we’ve seen the introduction of SMART boards (replacing blackboards), ICT and coding becoming core subjects/topics and more recently, the introduction of tablets in the classroom/lecture theatre.

    So where do we go from here? With virtual and augmented reality (VR & AR) being the topic on everyone’s lips, it is impressive to see how enthusiastic the sector has grasped the opportunity to revolutionize the way the world teaches and learns.

    VR headsets have been heavily implemented through the use of mobile phones and Samsung’s recent advert2 has shown how thes

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  3. DISPLAYING YOUR INNER FOODIE

    DISPLAYING YOUR INNER FOODIE

    With the ongoing rise in digital signage on our high streets, it is no surprise that digital menu boards have also taken a leap in popularity. With approximately 74% of customers1 reporting that an easily read menu is their main priority, it’s vital that businesses get it right, especially in fast food restaurants where menus are viewed from afar. Digital displays allow businesses to experiment with sizes, content and layout with very little cost and in minimal time. In this scenario, content is vital as nearly 7 out of 10 customers purchase products or services because the signage caught their eye1. But how do you go about sharing your dynamic menu content with the customer?

    Our digital menu mounting solutions are available in 4 formats;

    1. Wall Mounted
    2. Ceiling Suspended
    3. Ceiling Suspended with Rear Covers
    4. Back to Back

    Recently, Unicol, Sys-teams and Computacenter underwent th

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  4. IN-STORE MOUNT DESIGN

    IN-STORE MOUNT DESIGN

    High street stores have to wow and entice their customers in-store with dynamic digital display designs. This offers up mounting challenges, not only in the fluidity of change but also in the numerous
    building types and structural conditions that many retail stores occupy.

    With the retail sector on-line sales outpacing in-store growth for the last four years and the uncertainty of Brexit having a mixed impact, greater emphasis is being placed on analysis of customer habits at the point of sale.

    Changing dynamic content to match customer needs in an attempt to increase footfall is the only way some see of saving the high street from further decline. Of course, as competition in the retail sector is so fierce, all ways of gaining an advantage must be considered and keeping up with the latest technology is a position few can ignore. So what can a mount manufacturer bring to this signage party that is more than a wall or ceiling mount?

    THE

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  5. MOUNTING A 100 SCREEN VIDEO WALL WITH UNICOL

    MOUNTING A 100 SCREEN VIDEO WALL WITH UNICOL

    Oslo Central Station employed a 100-screen videowall to provide travellers with digital information for arrivals and departures as part of a modernisation programme across the Norwegian public transport system.

    AV-Design AS integrated what was hailed as the largest optically enhanced LCD videowall in Europe. The 100-screen monster, dubbed G-Wall, covered an area of nearly 60m2 and replaced a display powered by Auorescent tubes and installed in 1999.

    Forty-six inch LCD TFr bonded screens from manufacturer, GDS Displays were chosen for the videowall. The IP65 rated screens were used because of the risk from brake dust reducing screen life. They boasted narrow bezels with the manufacturer claiming that from a distance the gaps between the units were all but seamless.

    Jernbaneverkerket (JBV) manages Norway’s railways and wanted to install the display to improve information for its passengers and, by using a digital solution, allow it to easily adapt the content d

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  6. UNICOL SUPPLY 3X7 VIDEOWALL FOR FASHION REATILER, FOREVER 21

    UNICOL SUPPLY 3X7 VIDEOWALL FOR FASHION REATILER, FOREVER 21

    Competing against more established fashion brands, the US retailer Forever21 was relatively unknown within the UK market and had to make a big impression with its first UK store. The vast store frontage offered an opportunity to create a high visual impact using NEC video wall technology with specialist integrator, Decorum-Technology and mount solution provider Unicol.

    The video wall was to be part of the shop front and was required to fill a huge area, two storeys high, alongside the store entrance. Forming the physical shop frontage, issues of security and longevity were paramount, the screens would need to be robust enough to withstand physical assault to ensure continued peak performance with easy access for maintenance. An additional glass frontage would be costly and would pose a problem for cleaning due to the close proximity of the video wall. The sheer size and unique configuration of the project required extreme adaptability, and presented a challenge

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